We begin to find and become ourselves when we notice how we are already found, already truly, entirely, wildly, messily, marvelously who we were born to be. The only problem is that there is also so much other stuff, typically fixations with how people perceive us, how to get more of the things that we think will make us happy, and with keeping our weight down. So the real issue is how do we gently stop being who we aren’t? How do we relieve ourselves of the false fronts of people-pleasing and affectation, the obsessive need for power and security, the backpack of old pain, and the psychic Spanx that keeps us smaller and contained?

Here’s how I became myself: mess, failure, mistakes, disappointments, and extensive reading; limbo, indecision, setbacks, addiction, public embarrassment, and endless conversations with my best women friends; the loss of people without whom I could not live, the loss of pets that left me reeling, dizzying betrayals but much greater loyalty, and overall, choosing as my motto William Blake’s line that we are here to learn to endure the beams of love.


Coaching for Creative Teams: 5 Tips to Inspire and Invigorate


Exceptional article for creative managers!

“It’s fine to say, ‘This design isn’t working for me. My eye doesn’t know where to go on the page.’ Or ‘You appear to have buried the lead in the third paragraph.’ But don’t go deeper than that,” she says. “You identify the problem. They solve it.”

“1. Take a quarterly vacation
2. Hold a “retrospective” after projects
3. Write every day
4. Create an “interesting people fund”
5. Keep “tear sheets” to get inspired
6. Nap every day
7. Envision what you will be remembered for
8. Brainstorm at the bar
9. Get out of the building
10. Engage in “morphological synthesis””

99U culls 10 creative habits you should steal from worthy models like Cheryl Strayed, James Victore, and Ze Frank – details on each at the link.

Pair with the daily routines of famous writers and 99U's field guide to honing your creative routine, then revisit William James on the importance of habit.

(via explore-blog)

accidental-typographer:

For You The World (#2)
Handwritten typography 8.11.14 photo#SpclRqst#GoinGlobal

accidental-typographer:

For You The World (#2)

Handwritten typography 8.11.14 photo
#SpclRqst
#GoinGlobal

Data: Chicken outnumber us by a wide margin.


(This might just be my favorite infographic ever)

Before you waste time churning out unwanted content, spend time figuring out what your ideal customer wants.

[…]

It’s up to marketers to align themselves with consumers, not the other way around.


“Leave the door open for the unknown, the door into the dark. That’s where the most important things come from, where you yourself came from, and where you will go.”

explore-blog:

Happy birthday, beloved children’s book author Ruth Krauss  (July 25, 1901–July 10, 1993)! Celebrate with Open House for Butterflies, her final and loveliest collaboration with Maurice Sendak.

explore-blog:

Happy birthday, beloved children’s book author Ruth Krauss  (July 25, 1901–July 10, 1993)! Celebrate with Open House for Butterflies, her final and loveliest collaboration with Maurice Sendak.

(Source: explore-blog)

SO MUCH YES.


"I want people to be forthright with me and tell me if I’m doing something wrong. I want them to tell me if I have something in my teeth."

"The worst thing that you can do to someone is not give them feedback, because it’s almost as if you’ve given up on them."

"I also want to build teams where people feel like they can bring their authentic self to work and that we accept that, embrace that, and use that diversity and that authenticity to our advantage to do amazing things."

How to Lead with Tough Love

“Be relentless without being obnoxious. Be ambitious, and own your ambition—that goes especially for women. It’s okay to say, ‘I want greatness.’”

(via explore-blog)

(Source: explore-blog)

This came from my fortune cookie at lunch. I’m not sure if it helps with my quest for patience or has the opposite effect. Either way, the irony made me laugh out loud.

This came from my fortune cookie at lunch. I’m not sure if it helps with my quest for patience or has the opposite effect. Either way, the irony made me laugh out loud.

Today’s revelation: stop pushing so hard against the invisible, exhausting wall. I’m constantly trying to squeeze progress out of every second of my life. While I don’t ever want to stop growing, I’ve recently felt a snowballing sense of frustration and impatience that isn’t serving any positive purpose.

Today I got the distinct feeling that there’s someone pushing back on the other side of it, someone way stronger than me, and he’s trying to tell me to just chill out for a minute.

via via via